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Thread: Happy Buddha

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    Happy Buddha

    My first outing today with the Olympus OM-D E-M1 and an old lens, namely a P-Nikkor Nippon Kogaku 105mm f2.5 using an adapter. Manual focus could have gone better, but it is experimental. Clearly there is room for improvement? All comments welcomed.

    Happy Buddha by postmaster philip, on Flickr
    Best wishes
    Phil

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    I think those ears make him look like a Ferengi from Star Trek....

    Well, you did say all comments!
    "Stef" E-620 and stuff...

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    Quote Originally Posted by West Arm Rider View Post
    I think those ears make him look like a Ferengi from Star Trek....

    Well, you did say all comments!
    Hahaha!

    I can see the likeness......Live long and prosper
    Best wishes
    Phil

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    Sorry, can't think of a 'funny' this late at night, so I'll just suggest you try focus peaking, but you will need to program a function key to activate it with that lens.
    Ross
    I fiddle with violins (when I'm not fiddling with a camera).
    Cameras: OM-D E-M1 & Mk II, Olympus Stylus 1, OM-D E-M5.
    Lenses: M.ZD40-150mm f2.8 PRO Lens with MC-14, M.ZD12-50, M.ZD60 Macro, M.ZD75-300 Mk II, MMF-3, ZD14-54 II, ZD12-60 SWD, ZD50-200 SWD, EC14, EC20, EX25, Sigma 150mm F2.8 APO Macro DG HSM.
    Flashes: FL36R X2, FL50R, FL50.
    Software: Capture One Pro 10 (& Olympus Viewer 3).

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    Quote Originally Posted by Ross View Post
    Sorry, can't think of a 'funny' this late at night, so I'll just suggest you try focus peaking, but you will need to program a function key to activate it with that lens.
    Thank you Ross for the pointer about focus peaking. Is that also focus stacking? It has been said that a 'poor workman blames his tools', but on this occasion the adapter was not stable, in fact it was a bit wobbly. I felt nervous that the lens was going to fall off for the shoot. I have seen another adapter, a more expensive one which promises to be able to take any lens. It uses little thumbscrews to hold the lens in place.

    I am going to have another bash at doing the photo again, once I have mastered focus peaking. Thank you for your suggestion.

    Happy Buddha and myself have been together for nearly 30 years. We first met in an antique shop in Rye
    Best wishes
    Phil

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    We obviously can't see the rest of the statue, but I wonder if the photo would work better as a vertical/portrait orientation, since the statue is vertical. It would lend a greater sense of grandeur to the subject, and eliminate some of the background. Keeping the background blurred, as you have, is definitely a good idea. I've also learned to check for anything in the background that might be distracting or otherwise draw attention away from the subject, such as bright areas or lines/shapes/objects intersecting the subject.

    Focus peaking, as Ross suggested, is a feature that highlights the in-focus areas in the viewfinder (or the real LCD screen). It's very helpful for manual focusing. Focus stacking is a technique/feature that takes multiple images, each focused at different points, and combines the images in software. It's used to increase depth of field. The focus stacking feature in Olympus cameras only works with certain Olympus MFT lenses. You can, of course, do focus stacking by taking multiple photos manually (best to use a tripod), but you'll have to combine them using other software later.

    - Hal -
    A Still Mind - Photography, Music, Meditation, Ministry - www.astillmind.net
    Olympus E-M5; Panasonic-Leica DG Summilux 25mm; Zuiko 12-60 SWD, 50-200 SWD; Sigma 105 Macro; Rokinon (Samyang) 7.5mm fisheye; Olympus 8/1.8 PRO fisheye; FL-50R; Giottos MT-8361 tripod with Gitzo GH2780QR ballhead.

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    Re: Happy Buddha

    Quote Originally Posted by hschnee View Post
    We obviously can't see the rest of the statue, but I wonder if the photo would work better as a vertical/portrait orientation, since the statue is vertical. It would lend a greater sense of grandeur to the subject, and eliminate some of the background. Keeping the background blurred, as you have, is definitely a good idea. I've also learned to check for anything in the background that might be distracting or otherwise draw attention away from the subject, such as bright areas or lines/shapes/objects intersecting the subject.

    Focus peaking, as Ross suggested, is a feature that highlights the in-focus areas in the viewfinder (or the real LCD screen). It's very helpful for manual focusing. Focus stacking is a technique/feature that takes multiple images, each focused at different points, and combines the images in software. It's used to increase depth of field. The focus stacking feature in Olympus cameras only works with certain Olympus MFT lenses. You can, of course, do focus stacking by taking multiple photos manually (best to use a tripod), but you'll have to combine them using other software later.

    - Hal -
    I had another go this afternoon, using one setting for auto and another for focus peaking, quite large files, taken using a tripod and wired remote. I am going to revisit again with your suggestions. The background is a simple TV set with the screen switched off. I think the focus peaking came out a tad different. One reason I decided not to show the full statue, is that he has very large breasts, large nipples and an exceedingly large belly. I wasn't sure about posting it up. Any thoughts? Thank you very much.

    auto by postmaster philip, on Flickr

    focus peaking by postmaster philip, on Flickr
    Best wishes
    Phil

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