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Thread: Seeking advice with E1

  1. #21
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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Quote Originally Posted by JewelryPhotos View Post
    Thanks. That was one of the things I wasn't sure about. These cameras are SOOOOO different from when I used to do film photography.
    Understood, but there are some major advantages to digital, particularly when you are learning a new camera or camera/lens combination. You do not have the delay between taking the picture then waiting (or doing) the development to see how it turned out. [You also save the processing costs, of course.]

    The big advantage in the learning curve is that you can immediately see what you did right, or wrong. I found it most useful after I mastered the basics with the new camera to start exploring the effects of changing settings.

    The Olympus menus, and manuals, can be a bit intimidating as there are many options which are in the settings, and a wide range of adjustments. So I would spend time exploring the effects of one feature in one session (making notes if I felt necessary). I would not try to explore everything at once, but that is just my personal approach.

    If you did not get a copy of the printed manual with the camera, the PDF versions are available here (check the Wiki I mentioned earlier) or from the Olympus websites. The leaflet manuals on the lenses are also available in PDF form here and at Olympus. Those lens leaflets are multi-lingual and do not contain much more than the specifications of the lenses and some illustrations.

  2. #22
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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Compared to film cameras, controls are different, mostly. And manual focusing with a standart screen is a guesswork, but otherwise it is quite the same..
    E-1 is the most user-friendly of digital SLRs, IMO.. looking into menu of more recent 4/3 or newer m4/3 cameras is an easy way to have a headache.
    Regards, Pavel.

    E-1(x2) | ZD 14-45 | ZD 14-54 | ZD 40-150 Mk.1 | ZD 70-300 | FL-50 | Velbon Sherpa 750R
    M42(Pancolar 50/1.8, Pentacon 200/4)+ M42->4/3 reduction

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Quote Originally Posted by T-Lama View Post
    Compared to film cameras, controls are different, mostly. And manual focusing with a standart screen is a guesswork, but otherwise it is quite the same..
    E-1 is the most user-friendly of digital SLRs, IMO.. looking into menu of more recent 4/3 or newer m4/3 cameras is an easy way to have a headache.
    I definitely agree with those comments! I appreciate that Olympus has added features, but the menus have obviously been designed by the people involved in designing and building the cameras. They know the product, so the menus make perfect sense to them (but they are too close to the trees to see the forest).

    The most recent cameras have started to make their way back towards more user-friendliness. The overly involved menus have been a long-term gripe I have with Olympus.

    The approach should be to give the camera to someone who is unfamiliar with the line and make it easy for them to accomplish the most common uses. Then make the more advanced features available to the more experienced users in a straightforward manner.

    All to many technical devices, whether cameras, computers, etc., do not pay sufficient attention to designing a good user interface. Designing good user interfaces is a decidedly non-trivial job.

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Quote Originally Posted by JewelryPhotos View Post
    So just to be sure (while I'm looking)... "OM mount" and "C mount" are entirely different animals and will NOT work with my E1... correct?
    You would need to use an adapter for the Olympus OM lenses and they would be manual focusing and manual aperture adjustment (as mentioned early in this thread). Olympus makes such an adapter (MF-1) and there are any number of other manufacturers available through camera dealers or on eBay. Look up comments here or at other sites for opinions on the quality of those other manufacturers. I've never had a problem with the Olympus MF-1 adapters I have with my OM lenses.

    I think that C-mount lenses are not compatible with the Four-Thirds (E-1) mount because of the flange distance (distance between the mount and the focal plane). There are adapters for those lenses for the micro-Four-Thirds cameras, because those cameras have a shorter flange distance.

    UPDATE -

    Four-Thirds mount flange focal distance 38.67 mm

    C mount flange focal distance 17.526 mm, thus these lenses are NOT compatible

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    There is possibly another option here but perhaps I'm assuming to much in how new to digital photography you are. It is possible to crop your digital image in a computer program, such as Goggle Picasa, which is free, reasonably good and down loadable off the net. Picasa also gives you a starting point into other picture manipulation and a great storage/retrieval method. Take your photo, load it into your computer using Picasa and then crop it to a larger size... might be a good enough option and its free and immediate...
    "Stef" E-620 and stuff...

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Thanks everyone.

    I'm usually a pretty bright person and can pick things up quickly. Although I do know the most basic concepts (like aperture, f-stops, etc), and I have used digital cameras for the past 12 or so years for taking jewelry photos (Nikon CoolPix and Canon Powershot SX20is)... the menu screen on the E1 is VERY intimidating. Ha ha ha!

    Lucky for me... all I have to do is get things right once, and then I will be golden. not taking pictures of anything that will change. Lighting should always be the same, distance, etc.

    I'm a quasi-expert in photo-editing (Photosohp)... which means I'm way better than your average bear but not as good as the fancy schmancy experts who know everything.

    It sounds like I need to save my pennies and get a 35mm macro lens for the E1. Maybe I can find a pawn or camera shop that will let me trade something I've got.

    BTW, any opinions on why that eBay listings says "manual focus"? I was under the impression that if I get an FT 35mm macro lens, it will be compatible (focus system-wise) with the E1.

    Thanks again for all the help!

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Quote Originally Posted by West Arm Rider View Post
    There is possibly another option here but perhaps I'm assuming to much in how new to digital photography you are. It is possible to crop your digital image in a computer program, such as Goggle Picasa, which is free, reasonably good and down loadable off the net. Picasa also gives you a starting point into other picture manipulation and a great storage/retrieval method. Take your photo, load it into your computer using Picasa and then crop it to a larger size... might be a good enough option and its free and immediate...
    Yes, that's a good option. There is also a reasonable amount of adjustment available in the free Olympus Viewer program :-)

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Thanks West Arm Rider and mhobart!

    I'm going to try now... again... to take a photo with the 14-42.

    Does anyone have a ballpark guess as to the closest I should be able to get to the physical item so that the lens will focus?

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Lens specifications says minimal focusing distance is 29cm (measured from sensor), but I don't know if that is with or without AF (manual focus allows slightly shorter distance, sometimes).
    Regards, Pavel.

    E-1(x2) | ZD 14-45 | ZD 14-54 | ZD 40-150 Mk.1 | ZD 70-300 | FL-50 | Velbon Sherpa 750R
    M42(Pancolar 50/1.8, Pentacon 200/4)+ M42->4/3 reduction

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    Re: Seeking advice with E1

    Quote Originally Posted by T-Lama View Post
    Lens specificatins says minimal focusing distance is 29cm (measured from sensor), but I don't know if that is with or without AF (manual focus allows slightly shorter distance, sometimes).
    Thanks. I'm cool with being a foot away from my jewelry.

    I've seen some other people's jewelry photography ses and they have their camera way back from the jewelry (like 3 feet or so) and have long lenses on the cameras.

    That's so opposite what I do. But when I saw those, I thought, "Hey, I can use this big lens I've got, right?" Wrong. :-)

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