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Anybody registered on the Four Thirds User discussion forum and galleries can start their own blog here.

  1. Is the new Panasonic Lumix GX8 a game-changer?

    Panasonic's new GX8 is packed with cutting-edge developments for Micro Four Thirds



    Don't just look at the Lumix DMC-GX8 as an update to the two year old GX7, or a flat-top version of the recently released G7. I had an afternoon to try out the GX8 recently at a rather blustery Brighton and discovered why the GX8 is rather special.

    • One-third more pixels - a 20 megapixel first for Micro Four
    ...
  2. So the Olympus OM-D E-M5 sensor isn't a Panasonic, but does it really matter?


    Olympus has found a new source of sensor for the OM-D E-M5

    As I revealed on the forum earlier in this week after a tip-off from a highly trusted contact in the camera industry based in Japan, I am completely convinced that the Olympus OM-D E-M5 sensor is not made by Panasonic, so marking an end to the exclusive use of Panasonic sensors in Olympus Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds cameras since Olympus' last Kodak ...
  3. The new E-M5, GH2, GX1 and G3 and diffraction limits

    Over at our sibling site I covered the issue of diffraction limiting digital cameras some time back. If you reduce the aperture setting in your lens beyond a certain point that relates to the pixel pitch of your camera's sensor and your images will get softer because of diffraction.

    With 12.3 megapixel Four Thirds and Micro Four Thirds cameras the theoretical diffraction threshold is almost exactly f/8 although in practice I find that f/7.1 is the aperture to aim for. Users of Micro ...
  4. Video: 12mm Oly, GH2, 25mm Leica

    Just wanted to share a recent short film of a wedding I recently did using the new 12mm Olympus, 4/3 25mm 1.4 (the older one, which is gorgeous), 57mm hexanon, 85 Rokinon.


    [ame="http://vimeo.com/29769149"]http://vimeo.com/29769149[/ame]

    "http://www.psynema.com/?p=781"

    Thoughts?

    12mm performed AF VERY WELL - continuously AF almost telepathically and handled flare VERY well.
  5. Flawed Beauty

    Photographers naturally posses a desire to capture beauty in nature and strive to produce images that display it to perfection. We all want the perfect sunrise, perfect waterfall or perfect vista. When it come to smaller details we are no less demanding. Nothing in nature is more beautiful than a flower but we cannot photograph any old flower, it has to be a perfect specimen.

    The same with leaves. Yesterday I spent a pleasant hour in a local park searching for fallen leaves, not ...
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  6. Might As Well Jump On the Blog-band Wagon...

    The name is Scott J. Owens, life-long resident of River Ridge, Louisiana (burb of New Orleans). Multimedia Producer & Owner of Scout Pro Productions, LLC., I am also a shutterbug. Recently got myself a Panasonic GF1 w/ EVF and the 20mm lens. I think I will start blogging about my photo jouneys, thoughts, expectations, etc. with the GF1.

    What to expect from my blogs Well, a little of everything from discussions on future photography realms, cameras, videography, & wildlife ...

    Updated 5th January 2010 at 06:10 PM by scoutpro (Make image larger.)

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  7. Still in Love

    Anne and I have been married for coming up on 34 years. After being away in the big city or sometimes just because I feel like it, I still love to bring home a small bouquet of flowers to bring out Anne's beautiful smile and expressions of appreciation . . .

    . . . and I still receive little personal messages as emails and sometimes even "love messages in the sand" from Anne.

    When out with a couple of our friends enjoying ourselves around the beach last week ...
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  8. Learning the E-620: Halloween

    I took the camera along to a Halloween party, and came away having learnt a number of lessons:

    • I should change my playback setting back from 'auto playback' to '2 sec'.
      I had originally set this because I was annoyed at looking at the picture and turning the scroll wheel to zoom or hit the left arrow to compare to the previous shot, only to find I'd jumped back to camera controls. However, this is a fairly minor irritation compared to applying a deletion lock instead of
    ...
  9. Learning the E-620: Focussing modes

    The E-620 has three focussing modes: Single AF, Continuous AF, and MF. For S-AF and C-AF, the release priority can be set via the menus and either a single focus point or all seven focus points can be used. Both S-AF and C-AF have a '+MF' option, allowing manual focus to be used.

    As has been discussed recently on the forum, the E-620 has a slightly odd behaviour in S-AF mode with release priority off. Once the shutter button is pressed it will take a picture once it finds focus, ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:36 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  10. Learning the E-620: Live View

    The Live View mode on the E-620 certainly has a number of foibles. It seems rather odd, for instance, that face detect is off in 'Auto' mode - which is where I would expect most users who wanted to use face detect to be. It also seems a bit odd at first that face detect does not work unless all the focus points are active - at which point the camera is suddenly able to put a focus point somewhere other than on one of the focus points. Clearly Olympus have designed Live View to be used in conjunction ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:36 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  11. High Expectations, Low Rewards

    We have high expectations of Nature. We love to photograph landscapes, flowers, trees and, in the autumn, fallen leaves. But we always want to find a pristine example, the perfect specimen, before we press the shutter.

    If we have a snowfall we want to capture the virgin snow before anyone, or anything, has walked on it. We expect a beautiful scene to be free of electricity pylons and other man made intrusions. To warrant the attention of our lens a flower must be perfect in every ...
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  12. Learning the E-620: Taking some photos!

    Last Saturday, a number of astronomers from the Division of Planetary Sciences visited Arecibo Observatory after their annual meeting in San Juan. I was there, working, but I brought the E-620 along and managed to get some pictures between talking to the visitors.

    One thing I certainly learnt was how fast and accurate the camera is. I took almost 200 pictures, and only 1 was not correctly focussed. I didn't miss a single shot because the camera was too slow. Not a single shot ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:37 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  13. 'Ullo John! Gotta New Tripod?

    You only need one camera, but a boy can never have too many tripods. Or so it seems with me! I already have a Benbo Mk1, which is incredibly robust, sturdy and flexible, a Benbo Trekker, which shares many of the qualities of it's bigger brother but is smaller and lighter, a Gitzo 106, which is very compact and lightweight and a Kennet of uncertain vintage which extends to about 10 feet, for which you also need a step ladder. With this selection I can cover anything from looking over a nine foot ...
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  14. I Couldn't Bring Myself To Do It!

    I took my complete Bronica system to town today, the first time it's been out of the house for over a year. The plan was to see how much trade-in allowance Cameraworld would give me against, for example, an E-P1 and/or a 9-18mm ZD for my E3.

    But it didn't happen. I just couldn't bring myself to do it. I had a look in the shop, of course and it was full of goodies. Yes, they had the E-P1 with both 14-42mm and 17mm lenses. They also had the GF1 with 20mm and EVF what a combination ...
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  15. Learning the E-620: How big is that camera?

    "[I]t's astonishing how much Olympus has crammed into its small dimensions" (DP Review)

    "Despite its compact size, the E-620 is loaded" (Pop Photo)

    "The E-620 pulls most of the important features found in the company's high-end SLRs into one compact, more affordable camera" (Imaging Resource)

    Whichever way you look, the E-620 is presented as a small camera. How does it stack up size-wise against my old H2?

    ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:37 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  16. Learning the E-620: Program Mode

    The way program mode works (auto mode and the various scene and art-filter modes generally follow this) should be easy to understand. After all, Olympus have kindly given us a chart at the back of the manual letting us know how the camera will operate with the 14-42 mm kit lens at 14 mm. Unfortunately, there is a problem with this: the chart does not reflect the default behaviour of the camera.

    On the chart, the camera keeps the aperture wide open (f/3.5) as the light level climbs ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:38 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  17. Learning the E-620: Auto ISO

    Unlike on my H2, where there was not a wide range of ISO levels without intrusive noise, the Auto ISO on the E-620 can, potentially, be useful (particularly for those, like me, who are just starting out and haven't quite got the hang of where the ISO button is yet). However, like all tools, it requires understanding in order to be used properly.

    The Auto ISO setting applies, by default, to most modes. It can be activated for M mode, but cannot be set to anything other than ISO 200 ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:39 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  18. Twee Or Reality?

    A few days ago I visited a local art exhibition. I always find this a rewarding experience on several levels. Not only is it an opportunity to admire the work of some very talented local artists, it's also a valuable exercise in sharing their vision and interpretation of familiar local scenes and, through their eyes, discovering new locations that have hitherto passed me by.

    Looking closely at the work of several artists, I was struck by their diligence at recording every feature ...
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  19. Learning the E-620: Why the E-620?

    When I started looking for a DSLR, I had two main uses in mind. I wanted a camera for general photography (not a problem), and I wanted a camera for taking pictures of birds (slightly trickier). With a 1.7x tele-converter on my H2, I could reach an EFL of 734 mm; it would be nice to have a similar reach (and focussing in less than a couple of seconds). To make sure this was no easy task, I had a budget of $1000 to work on. I also had no chance of handling the camera prior to purchase, so everything ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:39 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  20. Learning the E-620: Introduction

    After around a year of looking at cameras, I have finally bought an E-620. I am now starting to learn how to use it, and thought it might be of interest to some to share my experiences via the new blog facility here, and possibly to get some feedback on what I'm doing wrong!

    A bit about me:
    This is the first DSLR I have owned, my previous camera was a Sony DSC-H2, although I have used DSLRs before. A couple of my H2 photos have ended up as postcards, and one was shortlisted ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:40 PM by robminchin

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    Member blogs , Learning the E-620
  21. Women wanted!

    Why are there so few women photographers? At all levels. I was prompted to consider this question by a very amusing article (more of a rant, actually) by Ann Toon in the latest issue of Outdoor Photography magazine. Ann is a very successful nature photographer in her own right (in her own right...see, I'm only on the fourth sentence and already I'm being patronising, if unintentionally) and one half of a photographic partnership with her husband Steve.

    She recounts how it is often ...
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  22. Does Four Thirds Have A Better Aspect Than Other Formats?

    Andy raised a point about image aspect ratios in a comment on Ian's Daily Hints and Tips Blog yesterday. One particular feature that makes Four Thirds DSLRs unique is the image aspect ratio. In common with most compacts the ratio is 4:3 (not the reason for the name of the format, just a co-incidence). However, all other DSLR formats and systems are 3:2 in line with the old 135 (35mm) film format. The question is, does it matter?

    The answer is bound to be subjective, but to me it is ...
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  23. A Pocket Full Of Pixels




    As DSLR owners we often tend to dismiss digital compacts as inferior cameras that are hardly worth carrying, due to their compromised image quality caused by the tiny sensor. It's true that at high ISO IQ can leave a lot to be desired, but keep to around 100 ISO in good light and the quality can be ...
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  24. Working The Light

    What a lovely day it's been. As I walked my daughter to school this morning I rejoiced in the gentle warmth of the autumn sun on my face, tempered by the slightest cool breeze, and couldn't but notice how clean and fresh everything looked, washed by the crisp morning light. I just knew I had to get out to take a picture. It was a bit illogical, because the sky was that insipid, milky blue that unfortunately often contrives to ruin the potential of such promising days in terms of landscape photography. ...
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  25. Portrait Of A Place

    When you shoot a landscape in many ways it's like taking a portrait of a person. You can choose to show either its good side or its bad side, capture its mood, portray its personality and include enough visual clues to tell the viewer a bit about what goes on there. Rather than just aim to capture a beautiful scene, why not try to make your subject more interesting by attempting to show its true character, by taking a portrait of the place?

    A couple of years ago I spent a week exploring ...
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  26. Improve Your Landscapes With A Tripod

    If someone asks me the quickest way to improve their landscape photography I enquire if they always use a tripod. If they don't, that's the answer. The popular assumption is that you only need a tripod if the shutter speed falls below the level that you can hand hold with sharp results. This is certainly true, but is just one of the advantages of this remarkable and versatile three-legged friend.

    Look at this picture, for example:-

    ...
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  27. Land, Light and Location

    Yesterday, in my very first blog entry, I questioned how I would be using this new media and what I had to offer. The very first comment I received, from zzlipps, was in the form of a request that I share some of my landscape techniques. I must admit that is one area of photography where I have done relatively well in the past and it is a subject dear to my heart, so it's probably as good a place as any to start.

    The common misconception is that in order to get spectacular landscapes ...
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  28. A little bit like Penn and Teller

    I know that when I post images that show my raw unprocessed "before shots" or "all 1800 images from a wedding" - I am really making myself vulnerable and exposing myself as not being nearly as good photographically as some might presume that I am. The mystique of my images is gone!

    In some ways it's a little like Penn and Teller exposing the simplicity and trickery of magic acts - when what has kept people coming back to magic shows for years and years is the presumption ...

    Updated 22nd September 2009 at 09:26 PM by Robert Watcher

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  29. Bloggin' All Over The World

    Oh here we are and here we are and here we go
    All aboard and we're hittin' the road
    Here we go
    Bloggin' all over the world!


    All I can say is I'd better hold on tight, I'm frightened I might fall off!

    Being a little nave about these things I'm not totally sure about the difference between a forum post and a blog entry. As I understand it, I should still use the forum when I want to start a discussion but use my blog when I want to keep the focus ...
    Tags: john, rant Add / Edit Tags
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  30. Something out of Nothing

    I am terrible for making something out of nothing. I know - - - you're not supposed to do it. Your supposed to get it right in the camera.

    My problem is that I am a visually spontaneous person who, is "into the moment" and far less concerned with whether I have it technically correct or composed perfectly. Mind you - I want it close, so that I at least have content to work with in the darkroom (I processed all of my own colour and black and white work in my traditional darkroom ...
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  31. 3 easy steps

    Thought that I'd make my first Blog post using parts of a recent forum thread where I displayed some dramatic images taken recently at a local fair - and was asked how I came to the vibrant colours of one of the images in particular.

    This is my final Display Image - which will make a great framed print. The shot was taken with my handlheld Olympus E-3, with 12-60 SWD mounted. Exposure was f3.7 @ 1/80'th second : 250 ISO

    ...

    Updated 21st September 2009 at 07:31 PM by Ian (Linked blog to relevant categories)

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    Member blogs , Image enhancement
  32. Welcome to blogging on Four Thirds User

    From today, any registered forum member on Four Thirds User can start their very own blog, right here.

    Blogs and forums
    So what is the difference between a blog and the forum? Think of a forum as a place to discuss things. It's a place where many talk to many.

    A blog is different. A blog is about you talking to many; the focus is on you and your subject. Although you can respond by commenting on a blog, fundamentally a blog is about you and what you have to say; ...
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