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Learning the E-620

Posts about my experiences and discoveries while learning to use the Olympus E-620.

  1. Learning the E-620: Halloween

    I took the camera along to a Halloween party, and came away having learnt a number of lessons:

    • I should change my playback setting back from 'auto playback' to '2 sec'.
      I had originally set this because I was annoyed at looking at the picture and turning the scroll wheel to zoom or hit the left arrow to compare to the previous shot, only to find I'd jumped back to camera controls. However, this is a fairly minor irritation compared to applying a deletion lock instead of
    ...
  2. Learning the E-620: Focussing modes

    The E-620 has three focussing modes: Single AF, Continuous AF, and MF. For S-AF and C-AF, the release priority can be set via the menus and either a single focus point or all seven focus points can be used. Both S-AF and C-AF have a '+MF' option, allowing manual focus to be used.

    As has been discussed recently on the forum, the E-620 has a slightly odd behaviour in S-AF mode with release priority off. Once the shutter button is pressed it will take a picture once it finds focus, ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:36 PM by robminchin

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  3. Learning the E-620: Live View

    The Live View mode on the E-620 certainly has a number of foibles. It seems rather odd, for instance, that face detect is off in 'Auto' mode - which is where I would expect most users who wanted to use face detect to be. It also seems a bit odd at first that face detect does not work unless all the focus points are active - at which point the camera is suddenly able to put a focus point somewhere other than on one of the focus points. Clearly Olympus have designed Live View to be used in conjunction ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:36 PM by robminchin

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  4. Learning the E-620: Taking some photos!

    Last Saturday, a number of astronomers from the Division of Planetary Sciences visited Arecibo Observatory after their annual meeting in San Juan. I was there, working, but I brought the E-620 along and managed to get some pictures between talking to the visitors.

    One thing I certainly learnt was how fast and accurate the camera is. I took almost 200 pictures, and only 1 was not correctly focussed. I didn't miss a single shot because the camera was too slow. Not a single shot ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:37 PM by robminchin

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  5. Learning the E-620: How big is that camera?

    "[I]t's astonishing how much Olympus has crammed into its small dimensions" (DP Review)

    "Despite its compact size, the E-620 is loaded" (Pop Photo)

    "The E-620 pulls most of the important features found in the company's high-end SLRs into one compact, more affordable camera" (Imaging Resource)

    Whichever way you look, the E-620 is presented as a small camera. How does it stack up size-wise against my old H2?

    ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:37 PM by robminchin

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  6. Learning the E-620: Program Mode

    The way program mode works (auto mode and the various scene and art-filter modes generally follow this) should be easy to understand. After all, Olympus have kindly given us a chart at the back of the manual letting us know how the camera will operate with the 14-42 mm kit lens at 14 mm. Unfortunately, there is a problem with this: the chart does not reflect the default behaviour of the camera.

    On the chart, the camera keeps the aperture wide open (f/3.5) as the light level climbs ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:38 PM by robminchin

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  7. Learning the E-620: Auto ISO

    Unlike on my H2, where there was not a wide range of ISO levels without intrusive noise, the Auto ISO on the E-620 can, potentially, be useful (particularly for those, like me, who are just starting out and haven't quite got the hang of where the ISO button is yet). However, like all tools, it requires understanding in order to be used properly.

    The Auto ISO setting applies, by default, to most modes. It can be activated for M mode, but cannot be set to anything other than ISO 200 ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:39 PM by robminchin

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  8. Learning the E-620: Why the E-620?

    When I started looking for a DSLR, I had two main uses in mind. I wanted a camera for general photography (not a problem), and I wanted a camera for taking pictures of birds (slightly trickier). With a 1.7x tele-converter on my H2, I could reach an EFL of 734 mm; it would be nice to have a similar reach (and focussing in less than a couple of seconds). To make sure this was no easy task, I had a budget of $1000 to work on. I also had no chance of handling the camera prior to purchase, so everything ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:39 PM by robminchin

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  9. Learning the E-620: Introduction

    After around a year of looking at cameras, I have finally bought an E-620. I am now starting to learn how to use it, and thought it might be of interest to some to share my experiences via the new blog facility here, and possibly to get some feedback on what I'm doing wrong!

    A bit about me:
    This is the first DSLR I have owned, my previous camera was a Sony DSC-H2, although I have used DSLRs before. A couple of my H2 photos have ended up as postcards, and one was shortlisted ...

    Updated 27th October 2009 at 09:40 PM by robminchin

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