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sosantney
19th November 2013, 05:27 AM
So I am new to the DSLR world and I purchased a GH2 as I've read reviews that it is great for film

I am currently trying to use the camera for stills and I've been reading online and the manual and am having problems. I also get this Red Camera that appears and a lot of my pictures will be out of focus

When I first used the Lens , It would take a photo right away without self timer, click and photo was taken. Now I can't figure out how to turn the setting off.
Could anyone help. Also - I want to take some portrait shoots of some ideas I've had in my head.

I need bit of specific help

I have my camera dialed to A - as I heard it is a good setting my other dial is facial recognition

So my questions are below - Im using Pany 20mm 1.7 Pancake

WB- Should I keep it set to AWB ?
ISO- Should I keep it at the lowest?
Metering- Spot?
Dynamic- Off- Low- High?
Resoultion? Off - Low, Standard?
I am also confused to the dial that get from -5 , 0 , +5 what should I have that set to?
Shutter Speed? I don't even know how to get the that under A setting.

Also anything to change under Menu

I understand everyone has there own niche of what works for them in terms of the type of photos they want to take , but if someone could help me with some settings and help resolve these issues till I have the ability to learn about the camera more that would be great

Anthony

RobertD
19th November 2013, 08:28 AM
Hi Anthony,
Set your program dial to iA (A is aperture priority), that's the red one. This will make the camera fully automatic. Then you can slowly learn all about WB, metering etc. If you are still getting the self timer operating then you need to move the lever on the program dial back to the top setting away from the watch icon.
Rob

Patrick
19th November 2013, 11:43 PM
Hi Anthony,
Set your program dial to iA (A is aperture priority), that's the red one. This will make the camera fully automatic. Then you can slowly learn all about WB, metering etc. If you are still getting the self timer operating then you need to move the lever on the program dial back to the top setting away from the watch icon.
Rob

Totally disagree no one learns anything using auto, since the camera makes the decisions the user never knows what's happening.

My advise is set the camera to A (leave that Ai alone)
With A you set the aperture the meter then selects the appropriate shutter speed for a correctly exposed image. If a particular shutter speed is required then use S and select the shutter speed and the meter will use an appropriate aperture for correct exposure.
Spot metering is a bit specialist use centre weighted to begin with.
The 20 mm lens is not the best for portraits unless they are full length, its a wider angle lens and can distort used for head and shoulders, this is NOT a faulty lens it is a charictaristic of wider angle lenses from any manufacturer.
Leave the AWB as it is, I'm an experienced photographer and use it all the time.
The + & - dial are a for more advanced workers so don't concern yourself about them untill you master the A setting & The S setting.
Is there a photo club near you if so join and there will be loads of people to help you, or alternatively is there a local night school that does photo courses?

Best of luck

Patrick

RobertD
20th November 2013, 12:20 AM
Patrick,
I wasn't suggesting that Anthony would learn leaving the camera on auto!
My suggestion was to put the camera on auto and then learn by reading the manual and trying setups. Obviously Anthony is a total beginner with the camera stuck on the self timer and thinking the 'A' setting gives good facial recognition! He needs to learn the basics first if he doesn't even know that A is for Aperture or what aperture means.
Rob

Ross
20th November 2013, 12:45 AM
Patrick,
I wasn't suggesting that Anthony would learn leaving the camera on auto!
My suggestion was to put the camera on auto and then learn by reading the manual and trying setups. Obviously Anthony is a total beginner with the camera stuck on the self timer and thinking the 'A' setting gives good facial recognition! He needs to learn the basics first if he doesn't even know that A is for Aperture or what aperture means.
Rob

I would agree as I had to get off using Auto or Program (when I got my first DSLR) by taking note of the resulting settings that came from the Auto, Program & Scene selections. It gave me some initial insight. As one begins to understand what aperture changes do & when it's appropriate to use certain shutter speeds the concept of selecting these settings can then start to make sense, but particularly after reading some good material on explaining how to use a camera & all it's available settings & when to use them. There are a lot of good books (magazines) on the subject that are helpful. Now I use Aperture Priority the majority of the time & Manual for absolute control, especially for certain night shots etc. or Shutter Priority for minimum shutter speeds where it matters & making changes in the Menu for various applications, but this all takes time to learn & reading is a good place to gain a lot of this knowledge (as well as asking for help on forums).

Patrick
20th November 2013, 11:04 AM
I would agree as I had to get off using Auto or Program (when I got my first DSLR) by taking note of the resulting settings that came from the Auto, Program & Scene selections. It gave me some initial insight. As one begins to understand what aperture changes do & when it's appropriate to use certain shutter speeds the concept of selecting these settings can then start to make sense, but particularly after reading some good material on explaining how to use a camera & all it's available settings & when to use them. There are a lot of good books (magazines) on the subject that are helpful. Now I use Aperture Priority the majority of the time & Manual for absolute control, especially for certain night shots etc. or Shutter Priority for minimum shutter speeds where it matters & making changes in the Menu for various applications, but this all takes time to learn & reading is a good place to gain a lot of this knowledge (as well as asking for help on forums).


I have seen this so many times at the club, people go auto and stay there it becomes a comfort blanket they get a result but learn nothing. I do concede some do move on.
Any way the problem seems actually using the camera functions, and I know the manual is a difficult read all Panasonic camera manuals appear to be so.
When I bought my GH2 I could not make head nor tail of it so bought this book
The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2: The Unofficial Quintessential Guide eBook: Brian Matsumoto Ph. D, Carol F. Roullard: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store@@AMEPARAM@@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41rG%2BdEm9iL.@@AMEPARAM@@41rG%2BdEm9iL (http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-GH2-Quintessential-ebook/dp/B0078X1SQM/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1) It is clear in its information and relatively easy to find answers on how to change settings.
Friends that have used it agree with me and we all recommend it. The link above is the Kindle version but there is a paper back book version as well.

Patrick

Ross
20th November 2013, 12:51 PM
I have seen this so many times at the club, people go auto and stay there it becomes a comfort blanket they get a result but learn nothing. I do concede some do move on.
Any way the problem seems actually using the camera functions, and I know the manual is a difficult read all Panasonic camera manuals appear to be so.
When I bought my GH2 I could not make head nor tail of it so bought this book
The Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2: The Unofficial Quintessential Guide eBook: Brian Matsumoto Ph. D, Carol F. Roullard: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store (http://www.amazon.co.uk/The-Panasonic-Lumix-DMC-GH2-Quintessential-ebook/dp/B0078X1SQM/ref=dp_kinw_strp_1) It is clear in its information and relatively easy to find answers on how to change settings.
Friends that have used it agree with me and we all recommend it. The link above is the Kindle version but there is a paper back book version as well.

Patrick

That looks a good book to help. Actually, I went to a community college course where we were encouraged to use manual for everything & that pushed us to learn how to use the camera to get the results we wanted & not what the camera would spit out on Auto. He also discouraged us from saving (& using) RAW which is OK to drive us to producing a correct jpeg from the camera (but not for serious post manipulations that a lot of us rely on now & maybe too much). Something like that can be helpful, so long as the teacher doesn't have a silly bias against gear that isn't C or N & that does happen.

Patrick
20th November 2013, 05:39 PM
That looks a good book to help. Actually, I went to a community college course where we were encouraged to use manual for everything & that pushed us to learn how to use the camera to get the results we wanted & not what the camera would spit out on Auto. He also discouraged us from saving (& using) RAW which is OK to drive us to producing a correct jpeg from the camera (but not for serious post manipulations that a lot of us rely on now & maybe too much). Something like that can be helpful, so long as the teacher doesn't have a silly bias against gear that isn't C or N & that does happen.

Educational photo courses do encourage using the camera in manual, some even encourage using an old manual camera with film, this approach may not give instant results but the pupil really learns what the relationship of aperture, shutter speed and ISO have with each other.
When I did a photographic course way back in 1966 we used view cameras with 5x4 sheet film, no auto functions in sight. We learned well understanding such things as correct exposure for what the image has to do, we pushed and pulled development to control contrast. We learned depth of field and how to make it work for what the photographer wants.

One of the problems we have these day is the cameras are sold as solving all these things in-camera automatically.

Patrick

RobertD
20th November 2013, 06:11 PM
When I started photography my first camera was an Exakta Varex IIb, one of the first SLR cameras, totally manual operation. So learning about exposure, measuring light, incident and reflected and setting exposure was all manual.
Rob

Riley
22nd November 2013, 08:31 AM
So I am new to the DSLR world and I purchased a GH2 as I've read reviews that it is great for film

I am currently trying to use the camera for stills and I've been reading online and the manual and am having problems. I also get this Red Camera that appears and a lot of my pictures will be out of focus

When I first used the Lens , It would take a photo right away without self timer, click and photo was taken. Now I can't figure out how to turn the setting off.
Could anyone help. Also - I want to take some portrait shoots of some ideas I've had in my head.

I need bit of specific help

I have my camera dialed to A - as I heard it is a good setting my other dial is facial recognition

So my questions are below - Im using Pany 20mm 1.7 Pancake

WB- Should I keep it set to AWB ?
ISO- Should I keep it at the lowest?
Metering- Spot?
Dynamic- Off- Low- High?
Resoultion? Off - Low, Standard?
I am also confused to the dial that get from -5 , 0 , +5 what should I have that set to?
Shutter Speed? I don't even know how to get the that under A setting.

Also anything to change under Menu

I understand everyone has there own niche of what works for them in terms of the type of photos they want to take , but if someone could help me with some settings and help resolve these issues till I have the ability to learn about the camera more that would be great

Anthony

AWB is fine, the monitor usually represents WB fairly well but can be tweaked
these bodies dont have IS, so you keep your shutter speed to 1/EFL (equivalent focal length), raise the ISO as necessary
Metering, I would use Intelligent Multiple, other choices are Center-Weighted and Spot, Spot is for trickier lighting than I am used to
iDynamic is only for jpegs and video, I use Standard
iResolution, also only jpeg, I use Extended

set RAW + jpeg, thats the most flexible
set Guidelines on for the EVF
Highlight on to detect blown highlights. Easy to do on this camera in jpeg
Direct Focussing Area On and Focus Priority On
AF + MF on, and you will need MF Assist On
DO set Constant Preview On, that makes the EVF see the scene as it really is
also set 'Shoot Without Lens' for MF lenses
where you will also need MF Assist mentioned before



I am also confused to the dial that get from -5 , 0 , +5 what should I have that set to?

sounds like you are looking at ev compensation, I would find it in the Menu and set for 1/3rd stops not 1/2 (.5)
you use this most when your picture preview shows blinking white areas, blown highlights



Shutter Speed? I don't even know how to get the that under A setting.

when you set 'A'perture priority it sets the shutter automatically
likewise 'S'hutter Priority allows you to set shutter speed, and aperture is automatically set

Patrick
23rd November 2013, 09:50 AM
AWB is fine, the monitor usually represents WB fairly well but can be tweaked
these bodies dont have IS, so you keep your shutter speed to 1/EFL (equivalent focal length), raise the ISO as necessary
Metering, I would use Intelligent Multiple, other choices are Center-Weighted and Spot, Spot is for trickier lighting than I am used to
iDynamic is only for jpegs and video, I use Standard
iResolution, also only jpeg, I use Extended

set RAW + jpeg, thats the most flexible
set Guidelines on for the EVF
Highlight on to detect blown highlights. Easy to do on this camera in jpeg
Direct Focussing Area On and Focus Priority On
AF + MF on, and you will need MF Assist On
DO set Constant Preview On, that makes the EVF see the scene as it really is
also set 'Shoot Without Lens' for MF lenses
where you will also need MF Assist mentioned before



sounds like you are looking at ev compensation, I would find it in the Menu and set for 1/3rd stops not 1/2 (.5)
you use this most when your picture preview shows blinking white areas, blown highlights



when you set 'A'perture priority it sets the shutter automatically
likewise 'S'hutter Priority allows you to set shutter speed, and aperture is automatically set

Some sound advice here, but wasted I think, the person that made the original appeal for help seams to have lost interest no sign that the replies have been read by them.
This sort of thing happens all too frequently.

Patrick